Teens Read More Than Kids and Adults!

The latest study from the Pew Research Center, “Younger American’s Reading Habits,” shows the biggest readers in the US are teens and young adults in their twenties! But you already knew that, right? 🙂 While the report is mainly positive, it did state that many young readers don’t realize that they can check out e-books from the library. You can do that here at the Tacoma Public Library!

  • 83% of Americans between the ages of 16 and 29 read a book in the past year. Some 75% read a print book, 19% read an e-book, and 11% listened to an audiobook.
  • Among Americans who read e-books, those under age 30 are more likely to read their e-books on a cell phone (41%) or computer (55%)than on an e-book reader such as a Kindle (23%) or tablet (16%). (Library Habits Release)

What I think is super cool about this study, is that they discovered that high schoolers are more likely to use the library to check-out books and research than other age groups! Why is that? Maybe because teens are smart and realize that they can select books from a huge collection and borrow them for free. They also know that libraries offer awesome FREE research assistance in the form of online databases and talented librarians.

  • 60% of Americans under age 30 used the library in the past year. Some 46% used the library for research, 38% borrowed books (print books, audiobooks, or e-books), and 23% borrowed newspapers, magazines, or journals.
  • High-school-aged readers were more likely to have borrowed the last book they read from the library (37%) than they are to have bought it (26%). This pattern soon reverses for older age groups—almost six in ten readers in their late twenties said they had purchased their last book. (Library Habits Release).
     
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